Fleet Electric Leasing

Reforestation and Carbon Reduction Projects

As part of our commitment to Climate Positive Leasing, every vehicle leased with Fleet Electric contributes to the investment in at least one of the following projects carefully chosen by our partners at Ecologi, with more great initiatives being added each month.

Each project is independently verified and certified by Gold Standard, Verified Carbon Standard (VCS) or Climate, Community & Biodiversity Standards.

 


Forest restoration in Kenya

Deforestation which has taken place in this region particularly since the 1970s – to support agriculture, charcoal production and livestock – has caused widespread degradation of the land, and when combined with recent droughts in the region has caused severe hydrological damage throughout local watersheds.  The Kass FM project site is located in the Mau Region of Southern Kenya, covering six individually-defined reforestation areas totalling 5,700 hectares in area. The land itself is owned by the Kenyan government and will be planted by local community members from the region.
Using an “employ-to-plant” methodology provides a consistent income in sustainable land-use practices for the local people who are employed as planters, nursery staff, and forest guards as part of the project activity.


Forest restoration in Kenya

Producing electricity from solar energy in Vietnam

Most of the energy generated in Vietnam (about 65% in 2015) is produced from coal and oil, but the country has a great potential to develop its solar power capabilities, due to the many sunshine hours and high solar radiation intensity, especially in the Southern part of the country.  The Quang Minh solar project installs and operates a solar farm in a rural part of Southern Vietnam, harnessing the country’s strong sun to generate renewable energy.
The estimated power output for this plant is 50MW, producing annual emissions reductions of just over 60,000 tonnes of CO2. Projects like this one produce emissions reductions by replacing electricity in the grid which would otherwise have been generated by fossil fuels like oil and coal.


Producing electricity from solar energy in Vietnam

 


Cleaner cookstoves in Zambia and Ghana

Rudimentary stoves, used for cooking, produce several greenhouse gases through the combustion of non-renewable biomass. These emissions are damaging to the climate, and also greatly increase levels of household air pollution which causes health conditions in the population. Ghana is the largest per-capita consumer of charcoal in West Africa, and charcoal is often used as biomass fuel for household cookstoves. The Toyola project in Ghana, and the 3 Rocks project in Zambia, to help reduce greenhouse gas emissions and support local families. The Toyola project replaces carbon-intensive charcoal stoves with fuel-efficient insulated stoves, known as the Toyola Coalpot, across Ghana. The '3 Rock' project replaces ‘three rock’ fires in the home with cleaner stoves, which dramatically cut annual biomass usage – by up to 66%.


Cleaner cookstoves in Zambia and Ghana

Producing energy from waste rice husks in India

India is the world’s second largest producer of rice, accounting for 22.5% of overall world rice production, and this means rice production is a particularly important source of income for rural populations. At the same time, India’s energy needs are rising fast, with growth in electricity demand and other energy uses among the highest in the world. Currently rural India largely relies on coal power plants, which not only emit CO2 but also contaminate local water sources and cause long-term health issues for employees. This small project involves the implementation of a 5MW cogeneration power project powered by waste rice husks. The project is designed to meet growing electricity demands as local manufacturing infrastructure develops, without producing increases in fossil fuel energy usage. Rice husks are the hard protective covering of grains of rice that are discarded when rice is harvested.


Producing energy from waste rice husks in India

Protecting old-growth rainforest in Peru

Madre de Dios is the third-largest, and least densely populated, region of Peru. It is home to much of the Peruvian Amazon. The Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa) tree is one of the largest and longest-lived trees found in the Amazon – they can grow up to 50m high, and live for over 500 years. Brazil nuts are notable for their rich content of vitamins and minerals, and this makes them an important and valuable non-timber forest product, and their passive harvesting provides a way to generate income from a tropical forest without destroying it. The Brazil nut concessions project supports the community to produce reliable income through this passive harvesting. This incentivises the protection of the forest and its carbon sinking capabilities since Brazil nut trees can only be found in old-growth forests. The project has also built a new processing facility, expanding a formerly subsistence activity into a viable income source. Additionally, the community receive carbon finance income generated by the protection of the rainforest.


Protecting old-growth rainforest in Peru

Peatland restoration and conservation in Indonesia

Peatlands are a type of wetland and are among the most valuable ecosystems on Earth. These unique habitats store massive amounts of carbon, with stocks below ground amounting to up to 20 times the amount stored in trees and vegetation. Despite covering just 3% of the Earth’s surface, they store more carbon than all other vegetation types in the world combined. When peatlands are cleared, drained or burned, the carbon stored within them is released into the atmosphere as carbon dioxide. The Katingan Restoration and Conservation Project is located within the districts of Katingan and Kotawaringin Timur in the Central Kalimantan Province of Indonesian Borneo. The project sets out to protect and restore 149,800 hectares of peatland ecosystem. This includes the protection of existing peatland forest through satellite monitoring and fire management. The team on the ground not only protect the area by preventing fire and illegal logging but also work to restore previously degraded areas of peatland forests through intensive peatland rewetting activities. 


Peatland restoration and conservation in Indonesia


Converting landfill gas to energy in Northern Turkey

Over 90% of the waste generated in Turkey is sent to landfill sites. This waste then decomposes and releases the greenhouse gas methane into the atmosphere. While methane molecules don’t stay in the atmosphere for as long as carbon dioxide molecules do, they have a much greater warming effect while they are there. The Samsun Landfill Gas to Energy Project is an innovative project to capture the landfill methane released from the Samsun landfill site and convert it into clean electricity. This project will collect the landfill gas that is released from the decaying waste with a newly constructed landfill gas collection and utilisation system. This gas will then be used to generate electricity. An estimated 54,600 MWh per year of electricity will be generated and exported to the Turkish national grid. The climate benefits of this project are therefore twofold: preventing harmful methane from being released into the atmosphere and contributing to global warming; and providing electricity to the grid, displacing energy that otherwise would have come from fossil fuels.


Converting landfill gas to energy in Northern Turkey

Turning waste biogas into electricity in Thailand

The production processes at distilleries generate large amounts of wastewater containing a high concentration of organic waste, which – when left untreated in open lagoons – leads to potent greenhouse gases like methane being released into the atmosphere. Because of the climate impact of these emissions from organic waste, it is vital to ensure the treatment of as much waste as possible, to minimise the potential for output of harmful greenhouse gases when the waste decomposes. This innovative project mitigates greenhouse gas emissions caused by the decomposition of wastewater from the Thai San Miguel Liquor (TSML) distillery in Bangkok, by capturing biogas from wastewater and converting it to electricity in newly installed engines. The process uses methane digesters – by installing a digester between the exiting sump pit and the lagoons, the wastewater is treated, with the subsequently captured methane used as biogas for electricity production.


Turning waste biogas into electricity in Thailand

Fuel-efficient cookstoves in Honduras

In Honduras, 1.1 million families cook with biomass on open stoves, representing around 51% of the total population. The cutting down of trees for fuel for open stoves is one of the contributing factors toward the country having one of the highest rates of deforestation in Latin America. These rudimentary cookstoves produce several greenhouse gases, including carbon dioxide, through the combustion of non-renewable biomass. These emissions are damaging to the climate, and also greatly increase levels of household air pollution which causes health conditions in the population – particularly affecting women and children. This small-scale project, run locally in Honduras by Envirofit, involves the distribution of 300,000 fuel-efficient cookstoves in households across the country. Because the new cookstoves improve heat transfer efficiency (reducing the amount of wood required to cook a meal), the project reduces the demand for biomass fuel, leading to a reduction in the rate of deforestation connected to wood consumption. 


Fuel-efficient cookstoves in Honduras

Onshore wind energy generation in Taiwan

Taiwan relies on imports of oil and coal for the vast majority of its energy, and renewables currently make up only a tiny portion of the country’s total energy consumption. Due to its location, the island has the potential to harness strong wind both on- and offshore. This large-scale project harnesses the strong prevailing winds along Taiwan’s Western coast, developing two onshore wind farms (one of 103.5MW and one of 46 MW). Combined, the wind farms consist of 62 turbines that generate renewable energy which is delivered straight to the national grid. Carbon emission reductions of around 300,000 tonnes per year, therefore, come from the displacement of fossil fuel energy within the grid.


Onshore wind energy generation in Taiwan

Forest protection in Northern Zimbabwe

Historically, large parts of Zimbabwe were covered by forests with abundant and diverse wildlife. As a richly biodiverse country featuring seven terrestrial eco-regions, 12.5% of the total land area of Zimbabwe is protected within its many National Parks, sanctuaries, and botanical gardens. In recent decades though, more than a third of Zimbabwe’s forests have been lost. The causes of deforestation here are primarily socio-economic, such as subsistence agriculture, urban expansion, poaching and collecting firewood – all exacerbated by political and economic turbulence in recent years. The Kariba REDD+ Project protects almost 785,000 hectares of forests and wildlife on the southern shores of Lake Kariba, near the Zimbabwe-Zambia border. It acts as a giant biodiversity corridor that connects four national parks and eight safari reserves, protecting an expansive forest and numerous vulnerable and endangered species – including the African elephant, lion, hippopotamus and southern ground hornbill.


Forest protection in Northern Zimbabwe

Protecting and restoring forests in Papua New Guinea

In the iconic Hans Meyer Range of New Ireland, Papua New Guinea, humid tropical forests range in elevation from sea level to 2,340m AMSL. The mountains here are highly biodiverse, home to many endemic and rare species of flora and fauna. These high carbon storage regions are under severe threat of conversion and degradation – from both legal and illegal logging, uncontrolled subsistence farming, and conversion to oil palm plantations. The new NIHT Topaiyo REDD+ project in Papua New Guinea aims to protect the rainforest, conserve local biodiversity, and enhance the traditional landowners and stewards of these rainforests through carbon credit production. The project plans to invest 81% of net revenue into local communities, distributing funds directly to individuals and also developing access to online schools, expanding regional healthcare provision, introducing solar-powered electricity, and financing a comprehensive biodiversity study.


Protecting and restoring forests in Papua New Guinea

Geothermal power production in West Java, Indonesia

Indonesia is an extremely volcanically active country, with around 130 active volcanoes – the most of any country in the world. This is a result of its unique position at the meeting point between several tectonic plates. This immense geologic activity gives the nation huge potential for producing electricity in a cost-effective and reliable method – from a renewable, sustainable source: geothermal energy. The project involves the development of a 117MW Geothermal Power plant, an addition to the existing 110MW power station built as part of Wayang Windu Phase 1. The project is named after and nestled at the base of, the twin volcano Wayang-Windu, which consists of the forested peaks of Mount Wayang and Mount Windu – 40km south of Bandung in West Java, Indonesia. The specific aim of the project is to use renewable energy generated from geothermal steam to displace electricity generated primarily from coal and diesel in the existing grid.


Geothermal power production in West Java, Indonesia

Preserving the Mesoamerican Biological Corridor in Guatemala

The Mesoamerican Biological Corridor stretches across Belize, Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, and some southern states of Mexico, connecting habitats and areas of tropical forest together. This corridor acts as a natural land bridge from South America to North America, allowing the movement of species between them. The corridor is home to multiple diverse biomes and contains between 7-10% of the world’s species. The project objectives are threefold: to mitigate climate change by reducing deforestation; to contribute to biodiversity conservation, and to foster the sustainable development of local communities. It will work to reduce CO2 emissions that result from the conversion of intact forest to agricultural and pastoral land by protecting existing areas of forest, establishing areas of reforestation, reducing illegal logging and providing alternative revenue streams from forest production e.g. sustainable agroforestry.


Preserving the Mesoamerican Biological Corridor in Guatemala

Providing clean energy through hydropower in Kanungu, Uganda

The Kanungu District is located in the Western Region of Uganda. It has historically been an impoverished district with a population of 205,095 often experiencing power outages that disrupt living on a daily basis. Energy poverty is one of the most significant challenges facing Africa today. In Uganda, only 46.25% of the population have access to electricity. Providing electricity access is crucial for poverty alleviation, economic growth and improving living standards. The Ishasha Small Hydropower project supports a 6.6 MW hydropower station which is located 500 meters below the border of Bwindi Forest National Park on the Ishasha River. It harnesses water from the river and drops it approximately 90 meters through two turbines to generate 29.404 GWh of electricity per year. This is fed into the Uganda grid, displacing electricity generated from the Uganda source mix. If the project activity was not implemented, the same amount of electricity would be generated from the fossil fuel power plants connected to the grid.


Providing clean energy through hydropower in Kanungu, Uganda

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